Book recommendation: 21st Century Solicitor: How to Make a Real Impact as a Junior Commercial Lawyer by Steve Weiner

This might be news: success as a twenty-first century solicitor is not dependent on your technical aptitude alone. Sorry. As well as the basic requirements of understanding and applying the law superbly, you are also now expected to master a whole suite of so-called soft skills — communicating empathetically, acting commercially, writing carefully, presenting brilliantly, networking sensibly and building relationships enthusiastically. These skills might be called soft by our industry, but the reality is that they are both incredibly hard and vitally important — especially as a junior commercial lawyer keen to make a likeable, professional, commercial and lasting positive impression on those in control of your embryonic career. Written by a lawyer with unique experience as a commercial practitioner, trainer and law-firm voyeur, this no-nonsense how to guide is an honest, punchy and modern look at all the skills you don t get taught at law school, yet are absolutely critical to achieving success from day one of your life as a twenty-first century solicitor.

Available from Amazon.

Other posts by

October 29, 2014   Posted in: News  No Comments

CompactGTL Ltd v Velocys Plc & Ors, Ch Div (Arnold J), 22/9/14

V’s patents relating to catalysts for use in the Fischer-Tropsch process for converting gases into liquid hydrocarbons were amended to correct an obviously mistaken reference, and were infringed by C’s catalyst structure and process. It would be immediately clear to the skilled person that the various references to “residence time less than five seconds” and “contact time less than five seconds” were unreconcilable, and that a mistake had been made in the drafting. A moment’s consideration by the skilled person would lead to the conclusion that the patentee had intended to refer throughout to “contact time”.

Other posts by

October 28, 2014   Posted in: Case Reports  Comments Closed

Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon
This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at ÂŁ120 for originals and ÂŁ40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email infoatqccartoondotcom  (infoatqccartoondotcom)  .

Other posts by

October 27, 2014   Posted in: Cartoons  Comments Closed

Weekend video: John Mortimer talks to Ludovic Kennedy – Portait – BBC

Other posts by

October 25, 2014   Posted in: News  Comments Closed

Book recommendation: Sober as a Judge (Roger Thursby) by Henry Cecil

Roger Thursby, the hero of Brothers in Law and Friends at Court, continues his career as a High Court judge. He presides over a series of unusual cases, including a professional debtor and an action about a consignment of oranges which turned to juice before delivery. There is a delightful succession of eccentric witnesses as the reader views proceedings from the bench.

Available from Amazon.

Other posts by

October 22, 2014   Posted in: News  Comments Closed

In the matter of Lemma Europe Insurance Company Ltd 6/10/14 (Ch)

In the liquidation of an insurer a solicitor challenged the liquidator’s assessment of its claims under a professional indemnity policy on the basis that they did not arise from a claim that had purportedly been notified. It was appropriate to deal with the claims in a liquidation with the least possible costs. The terms of the policy distinguished between notification of a claim and circumstances that might give rise to a claim. The purported notification of a claim did not amount to a proper notification because on analysis there was no communication of an intention to claim.

Other posts by

October 21, 2014   Posted in: Case Reports  Comments Closed

Monday morning with Alex Williams’ cartoons

qccartoon
This cartoon is by Alex Williams who draws the Queen’s Counsel cartoons for The Times and in numerous books including The Queen’s Counsel Lawyer’s Omnibus. He offers almost all of his cartoons for sale at ÂŁ120 for originals and ÂŁ40 for copies and they can be obtained from this email infoatqccartoondotcom  (infoatqccartoondotcom)  .

Other posts by

October 20, 2014   Posted in: Cartoons  Comments Closed

Weekend video: Lee Child: “A Wanted Man” & “One Shot”, Authors at Google

Other posts by

October 18, 2014   Posted in: News  Comments Closed

Book recommendation: Tomorrow’s Lawyers: An Introduction to Your Future by Richard Susskind

Tomorrow’s Lawyers predicts fundamental and irreversible changes in the world of law. For Richard Susskind, best-selling author of The End of Lawyers?, the future of legal service will be neither Grisham nor Rumpole. Instead, it will be a world of virtual courts, Internet-based global legal businesses, online document production, commoditized service, legal process outsourcing, and web-based simulated practice. Legal markets will be liberalized, with new jobs for lawyers and new employers too. This book is a definitive guide to this future – for young and aspiring lawyers, and for all who want to modernize our legal and justice systems. It introduces the new legal landscape and offers practical guidance for those who intend to build careers and businesses in law.

Available from Amazon.

Other posts by

October 15, 2014   Posted in: News  Comments Closed

Bailey & Anr. V Barclays Bank Plc (QB) 27/8/14

Barclays obtained summary judgment in respect of a swap misselling claim. The claimants sought a declaration that the interest rate swap was unenforceable under s. 27 of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 as well as rescission of the swap agreement, damages and equitable compensation. The second claimant was a company. It contended that it met the definition of a private person within s. 150(1) of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 because it had not suffered the losses of which it complained in the course of carrying on business of any kind. That contention was rejected as being contrary to the correct approach as stated in Titan Steel Wheels Ltd v Royal Bank of Scotland Plc approved in subsequent authorities. There was no basis for supporting a fiduciary relationship which would be exceptional for a banking relationship. The fact that an employee had given advice on behalf of the bank did not make it a third party for the purposes of s. 27 of the Act.

Other posts by

October 14, 2014   Posted in: Case Reports  Comments Closed